Snorkeling Safety

Wherever possible snorkel with a companion as it is also infinitely more enjoyable.

Wear protective footwear, i.e. fins or reef shoes are recommended for swimming and snorkeling to avoid coral cuts.

Watch out for the sun, as you do not feel strong exposure to the sunrays while snorkeling. A good idea is to wear a T-shirt, but for most efficient protection wear a rash guard, which is UV proof and protects your neck and arms as well.

When enjoying our lagoon, gloves can be worn to protect your hands from cuts. But please avoid causing damage to corals - lightly pushing you away.

snorkeling-fun

Basic snorkeling and use of snorkeling equipment.

When using fins, try to kick with straight legs by avoiding bending your knees too much. Otherwise your swimming with fins will be inefficient only causing a lot of splash and noise scarring away the fish. 

For comfort and efficiency when swimming with fins, keep your arms to your sides.

Make sure your mask strap is not fitted too tight, as it can cause discomfort and even headaches. Remember, the water pressure seals the mask to the face. 

Make sure your mask sits well up against your nose and not close to your upper lip; otherwise the potential leakage is high. 

Most snorkels are designed to be on the left hand side.

Dive Gear Tips

The staff at the Dive Shop take a pride in their knowledge about snorkeling gear, and are happy to give you advise in order to find you the "perfect fit" 

Mask 
Perhaps the most important piece of gear is your mask. You will need a high quality mask with a tight-fitting seal. Silicone is considered preferable to rubber for the skirt. The easiest way to test the fit of the mask is to lift the strap over the top of the mask and press the mask to your face (being sure not to capture any strands of hair) without breathing in. If it creates a slight vacuum and stays tight to your face, you've got the right fit. If not, move on until you find one that does seal properly. A proper fit will make a great difference in your enjoyment.   

Snorkel
A snorkel is a snorkel. Not true! There are varying bore sizes, different designs, alternating internal air pockets, etc, etc. Where to start? Try to find a snorkel that is comfortable, delivers air easily and breathes as dry as possible.

Fins 
Your fins give you mobility and speed. Remember this, not all fins are created equal. The variables are foot pocket design and fin size and shape. You have a choice between full-foot fins (ones that fit like a slipper around your heel) or open-heel fins. The latter are worn with some type of neoprene reef slipper with a flexible rubber sole. In either case, your fins should fit snugly but not too tight. 

dive-equipment-care

Snorkeling Tips

Basic snorkeling and use of snorkeling equipment. 

When using fins, try to kick with straight legs by avoiding bending your knees too much. Otherwise your swimming with fins will be inefficient only causing a lot of splash and noise scarring away the fish.

For comfort and efficiency when swimming with fins, keep your arms to your sides.

Make sure your mask strap is not fitted too tight, as it can cause discomfort and even headaches. Remember, the water pressure seals the mask to the face.

Make sure your mask sits well up against your nose and not close to your upper lip; otherwise the potential leakage is high.

Most snorkels are designed to be on the left hand side.

Gear tips.  

The staff at the Dive Shop take a pride in their knowledge about snorkeling gear, and are happy to give you advise in order to find you the "perfect fit"

Mask

Perhaps the most important piece of gear is your mask.

You will need a high quality mask with a tight-fitting seal. Silicone is considered preferable to rubber for the skirt.

Before using a new mask, clean the sense and out edges of the mask with toothpaste. This will remove the pre-use protective silicone layer and prevent fogging.

The easiest way to test the fit of the mask is to lift the strap over the top of the mask and press the mask to your face (being sure not to capture any strands of hair) without breathing in. If it creates a slight vacuum and stays tight to your face, you've got the right fit. If not, move on until you find one that does seal properly. A proper fit will make a great difference in your enjoyment.

Make sure your mask strap is not fitted too tight, as it can cause discomfort and even headaches. Remember the water pressure seals the mask to the face.

Make sure your mask sits well up against your nose and not close to your upper lip, other wise the potential for leakage is high.

Men with mustaches could use Vaseline for a better seal or shave a little off just under the nose.

 

Snorkel
A snorkel is a snorkel. Not true! There are varying bore sizes, different designs, alternating internal air pockets, etc, etc.

Where to start? Try to find a snorkel that is comfortable, delivers air easily and breathes as dry as possible.

Most snorkels are designed to be on the left side. Mount them closer to the mask.

 

Fins

Your fins give you mobility and speed. Remember this, not all fins are created equal. The variables are foot pocket design and fin size and shape.

You have a choice between full-foot fins (ones that fit like a slipper around your heel) or open-heel fins. The latter are worn with some type of neoprene reef slipper with a flexible rubber sole. In either case, your fins should fit snugly but not too tight.

When using fins, try to kick with straight legs without bending the knees to much. Otherwise your swimming with fins will be inefficient only causing a lot of splashing and noise that will scare the fish away.

For comfort and efficiency when swimming with fins, keep your arms to your side, tucked in under your chest or clasped behind your back.

 

Gear Mainenance

Defog mask by using anti-fog liquid. This guarantees a clear mask the whole day long.

Keep snorkeling gear under towel while the beach to prevent UV overexposure.

Always rinse your snorkeling gear in fresh water after use and let it dry in the shade.